Arrive in Eureka early and tour the city via Eureka Van Tours or the Historic Tram Tour. Notice the Victorian architecture, especially the gingerbread decoration used on many of the B&Bs, cottages and other buildings. Eureka is home to the largest collection of Victorian architecture in the central U.S., and as I mentioned before, the downtown district is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Visit Eureka Springs Historical Museum located in the center of the Historical District; it is located in the 1889 California building. The museum is the place to learn about the colorful past of Eureka Springs through its authentic photographs, papers and other memorabilia documenting the city since its beginning.
Don’t miss a chance to see the Crescent Hotel, just one of the five Eureka hotels predating 1906.Be sure to see the Downtown Cornerstone Bank, as well. The bank operates much as it did in years gone by; you can see the old brass teller cages, potbellied stove, original business machines and other working antiques.
St Elizabeth’s Catholic Church in Eureka Springs is located between the Carnegie Library and the Crescent Hotel. Richard Kerens built the church and dedicated it to his parents in 1909. The church was built with St. Sophia’s Church in Istanbul, Turkey in mind. There are 14 Stations of the Cross made of Italian marble along the right-hand side of the walk from the bell tower.